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News

 

 

Bangor, the light of the world

Administrator

Class 4 visited Bangor this week as part of their Local Geography and History lessons. North Down museum was a fantastic experience.

Monks, Vikings, thieving crows and delicious chips.

Merry, Merry, May

Administrator

How wonderful it was to celebrate May day in the sunshine for the first time in many years! It was a beautiful festival day and Class 11 got to have the chance to dance in their last ever school May Day. 

Welcome to our school, Susan and Kathrin!

Administrator

Class 4 have had a great first week with their new teacher, Susan Williams. Here they are visiting historic sights around Holywood this week and below, debating the lifestyle of a Viking over that of a peaceful farming community.

We also welcome Kathrin Kaub, as our new German teacher who will take classes while Nadine enjoys her new daughter, Sofia.

JOURNEY TO THE PAST

Administrator

Holywood Steiner School student, 15-year-old Ethan Scott-Davies, has been stepping into the past with a journey of discovery around some of the World War I battlefields of Belgium and France. History came starkly to life for Ethan as he joined Cadets from across the region to visit landmarks alongwhat was once The Western Front, the principal theatre of war from 1914-18, and learn about the unprecedented loss of life in ‘the war to end all wars’.  There were more than 17 million deaths and 20 million wounded, making this one of the deadliest conflicts in human history – and, as the Cadets discovered, many of those who sacrificed their lives were themselves little more than teenagers. It was an intensely moving learning experience, as Colonel David McCleery from the Army Cadet Force Association explains. He says, “Many of our Cadets have studied World War I at school so they were already quite knowledgeable, but it’s one thing reading about World War I in a history book but quite another to make the Battlefield Tour pilgrimage.  I think we were all rather overwhelmed as we visited the trenches where so many men fought and died, then saw the sombre rows of headstones in the region’s many military cemeteries.  Our Cadets were genuinely affected by all that they saw and heard during our visit and I know they were particularly moved when our Padre, Rev Jack Moore, officiated at brief acts of remembrance.  The Cadet movement is well known for the fun and excitement it offers its members in terms of outdoor adventure, sociability and sport, but there is also a more serious side to the benefits we offer our young people, as this tour demonstrates.  The visit was an enriching experience and I know it will stay with them for many years to come.”

Holywood Steiner School student, 15-year-old Ethan Scott-Davies, has been stepping into the past with a journey of discovery around some of the World War I battlefields of Belgium and France.

History came starkly to life for Ethan as he joined Cadets from across the region to visit landmarks alongwhat was once The Western Front, the principal theatre of war from 1914-18, and learn about the unprecedented loss of life in ‘the war to end all wars’.  There were more than 17 million deaths and 20 million wounded, making this one of the deadliest conflicts in human history – and, as the Cadets discovered, many of those who sacrificed their lives were themselves little more than teenagers.

It was an intensely moving learning experience, as Colonel David McCleery from the Army Cadet Force Association explains.

He says, “Many of our Cadets have studied World War I at school so they were already quite knowledgeable, but it’s one thing reading about World War I in a history book but quite another to make the Battlefield Tour pilgrimage.  I think we were all rather overwhelmed as we visited the trenches where so many men fought and died, then saw the sombre rows of headstones in the region’s many military cemeteries.  Our Cadets were genuinely affected by all that they saw and heard during our visit and I know they were particularly moved when our Padre, Rev Jack Moore, officiated at brief acts of remembrance. 


The Cadet movement is well known for the fun and excitement it offers its members in terms of outdoor adventure, sociability and sport, but there is also a more serious side to the benefits we offer our young people, as this tour demonstrates.  The visit was an enriching experience and I know it will stay with them for many years to come.”

After the performance

Administrator

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Noa Biscovitch and Theresa Murphy, of Class 6 (Year 8)along with their teacher and choir leader, Emma Morgan, bask in the afterglow of the concert they sang in with the Abbey Singers.